Therapeutic Treatment or Prevention of Heterotopic Ossification

Case ID:
C14475
Disclosure Date:
11/9/2016
Description:

 

JHU Ref. C14475

 

Unmet Need

 

Heterotopic ossification (HO) is the process of bone formation outside of the skeleton in areas such as soft tissue surrounding the joint. When this occurs, patients experience a high increase in pain and limited range of motion in their joint. HO can be caused by trauma to the hip or leg and even when patients have experienced traumatic brain or spinal cord injuries. There have been no effective protocols for the treatment or prevention of HO, but some people will undergo radiation therapy, anti-inflammatory agents, or surgery. While some of these therapies are successful in inhibiting inflammation, the therapeutic window is before clinical recognition by radiography, and surgical procedures have high recurrence rate and frequent complications. With limited knowledge of HO and no effective therapy, there is a need for a reliable method to treat HO.

 

 

Technology Overview

Researchers at Johns Hopkins University have discovered that excess activation of the coupling factor TGF-β for bone remodeling drives the progression of HO. By systemic injections of TGF-β neutralizing antibodies, HO progression is weakened. During HO progression, Nestlin lineage cells develops H-type vessels. Using the TGF-β antibody treatment, the Nestin+ cells were inhibited and H-type vessel formation was limited. By further targeting TGF-β signaling, HO progression can be hindered.

 

 

Stage of Development

To determine the role of bone modeling, Johns Hopkins researchers have examined surgical specimens of acquired HO. Their studies demonstrate that excess activation of TGF-β for bone remodeling drives the progression of HO. They have tested a TGF-β neutralizing antibodies on mouse models.

 

 

Publications

Wang, X. Nature 551, 9, 2018

 

Patent Information:
Inventors:
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For Information, Contact:
Christine Joseph
cjoseph6@jhmi.edu
410-614-0300
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