Ratiometric Sensor Response for Analyte Identification and Quantification

Case ID:
C14584
Disclosure Date:
2/2/2017
Description:
Unmet Need
Gas detection is necessary for the well-being of people and the environment in order to identify potentially harmful gases in the air. Technology has developed recently where active micro gas sensors are becoming smaller, lower cost, more efficient, and more accurate to allow for more applications in the chemical process, automobiles, life sciences, environmental protection, and public health industries. Currently, there are two main classes of micro gas sensors: highly selective materials that are sensitive to only one gas and materials which can detect multiple gases but cannot differentiate the gases. There is an unmet need for affordable gas detection technology that is both highly selective and sensitive to only one gas in order able to give an accurate reading despite interference from volatile contaminates in the surrounding air.
 
Technology Overview
Johns Hopkins researches have developed sensors which use ratiometric analysis to improve the selectivity and sensitivity of gas detections by measuring the response of multiple organic field transistors (OFETs) of different compositions. Most importantly, this technology allows for the differentiation of gases and contaminates. The technology is a platform for the emergence of OFETS into the market. Currently the market is dominated by metal oxide field effect transistors (MOS FETS); however, the relative ease of chemically functionalizing OFET materials makes it highly desirable and compatible with the ratiometric analysis technique. A device can be designed with multiple OFETS that have been chemically modified to have radically different responses to different gases. This device can identify and differentiate gases and their relative concentrations. This raises the performance OFETs closer to MOS FETs while providing the added benefits of organic electronics such as low manufacturing cost, reduced weight, low power requirements, and flexibility.
 
Stage of Development
Looking to market.
 
Publications
ACS Appl. Mater. Interfaces 9, 24, 20501-20507
Advanced Functional Materials 2013


 
Patent Information:
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For Information, Contact:
Seth Zonies
szonies1@jhmi.edu
410-614-0300
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